ヘ短調作品34

ルブランの回想録の link 先はゲストブックを御覧ください。

全体表示

[ リスト | 詳細 ]

記事検索
検索

全695ページ

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]

[ 次のページ ]

The Cherry-Blossoms in Japan

イメージ 1

The Cherry-Blossoms in Japan
 
The season of cherry-blossom in Vancouveris over heralding the approaching high-spring. The blossoms added to the scenicbeauty of the ever-green city, but did not call up my nostalgia for Japan. Theylooked slightly strange. Belonging to the familiar species in Japan, theyvisited and left Vancouver in a different manner.
 
Different surrounding landscapes may be aplausible reason. However, it seems to me that the most distinctive is in themanner of ending their lives. The blossoms in Vancouver remained fairly long onthe branches and faded into pale color, mismatched with young leaves. In theleast windy city, we enjoyed an even calmer spring, which began and ended likea lamb. In Japan, they fall from their branches with a storm in spring, beforethe tree begins to drink spring rain and to be luxuriant with green leaves.
 
The Japanese people’s attachment to theblossom is well-known. It is their favorite subject in art and literature andhighly regarded as the national flower. Why does it attract the Japanese somuch? Lovely, it is surpassed by many other flowers. While a cluster ofcherry-blossoms deserves to be ranked highly, it never threatens to rival apiece of rose in form and color even according to the authentic Japanese canonof floral beauty. So we cannot account for their attachment to the blossomsbecause of the visual beauty alone. The Japanese way of appreciating a floweris different from the Western way and characterized as literary. “Don't appreciate a flower only in full bloom.” is a maxim accepted among not onlyamateurs but ordinary people and is representative of the Japanese exquisitebeauty-consciousness. Such a feeling, especially for the cherry-blossoms, wouldprovide a clue to finding the mental attitude unique of the Japanese.
 
They even appreciate falling blooms. Theirtaste for ephemeral beauty underlies this attitude. Short-life is essential forexalting beauty to its supremacy. Typical of this kind of beauty, fireworkslose their brilliant light in a moment and hence are beautiful. Otherwise, theyare no more than a blaze of neon signs downtown. For the Japanese, thecherry-blossoms should not be long-lived but fall quickly. Blessed withseasonal varieties in the landscape, they are happy to find eternal life inanything ephemeral and evanescent.
 
Let’s look at a Japanese favorite scene.There is a hill, covered with a dense forest, which sprawls over the centralpart of an old city. In the midst of a morning, only the masonry of a mossystone-fence that reflects on the water betrays a history of the city. This isan old castle surrounded with its moat, the origin of which is traced back tothe age of shogunate Japan. Early in the morning, some petals of the cherry blossoms begin to fall and slip into the mist. As soon as the sun sweepsaway the mist, the old castle looms with its keep silhouetting against the bluesky. Fretted with petals, the moat mirrors cherry-trees on the rampart yieldingto a blast of wind. The petals on the water form a cleanly beautiful patternvarying with a capricious breeze. When a spring storm visits, it whirls uppetals high in the air and fiercely blows them against a passerby’s face. Theyare snowflakes dancing in the bright spring. The splendor of breathtakingbeauty is what the Japanese people eagerly await every year. The moats havebeen fully carpeted with pinkish white petals until the eastern part of thecity is overshadowed by the castle.
 
The passer-by can indulge in a romanticsentiment, resigning himself to the blossom storm and realize his short andbeautiful fate. He can taste a sentimental ecstasy watching petals dance whenhe identifies himself with the blossoms. He wishes that his end would bebeautiful like this. The fall of the blossoms suggests death. So, this emotionaroused by the scene is easily associated with beautiful death, the samurai’sphilosophy, which is reduced to the problem of how to prepare himself for his deathin service of his lord. Therefore, the blossom of feminine appearancetraditionally symbolizes the very masculine aesthetics.
 
The militarist-ruled government did nothesitate to exploit this feeling and to discipline recruits into determinedsoldiers of suicidal tendency. During World War II, the blossoms wereunfortunate to play the leading role as an official militaristic emblemopposite the imperial crest of chrysanthemum, representing self-sacrifice forthe divine emperor. The ephemeral beauty of the blossoms induced many soldiersto sacrifice themselves. A good cherry-blossom should fall quickly. Likewise, itis un-Japanese for a good Japanese soldier long to survive his comrades. Theyovercame the horror of death through their identification with the blossoms.Every year, the cherry-trees in Yasukuni Shrine, dedicated to soldiers sung orunsung, bloom in memory of their valiancy. A piece of the blossom is areincarnation of a soldier who fell in battle and was triumphantly receivedinto the Shrine.
 
In spite of the sorrowful collaborationwith the War, I love the literary sentiment that the Japanese hold for theblossoms and am proud of the unique delicacy of the Japanese. We know theglorification of death in terms of martyrdom for religious belief, self-sacrificefor love in the Western country, where the glorious death is compensated withgarlands. In my knowledge, however, there is no symbolic association betweenfallen flower and death in Western countries except The Selfish Giant by OscarWilde. In the last scene, the old giant meets again a boy under a tree coveredwith white blossoms, who now presents himself with stigmata on his palms andfeet and invites the giant to his garden. In the afternoon, the giant is found“lying dead under the tree, all covered with blossoms”. Although the author didnot utterly refer to blossoms in the falling process, it seems to me that theblossoms in the context are more than a shroud of his body, in celebration ofhis departure for Paradise. While Wilde’s sense may not be very parallel to theproper Japanese one, anyone who loves the scene can understand the Japanese wayof appreciating the cherry-blossoms.
イメージ 1

HuffingPostの11月30日号の記事に、「13歳のゴッホの写真」、実際は「弟のテオ」だったと判明!という記事があった。この記事にいちゃもんをつける気はない。論旨は明快である。肖像を撮った写真館開業の年からテオの肖像写真を判定した記事には異論はない。
 
だがHuffingPostはついでにヴィンセントそっくりの肖像画をヴィンセントの自画像ではく、弟のテオを描いたものだとオランダのヴァン・ゴッホ美術館が断定している。私は美術館の勇み足だと思う。その根拠は単純である。何ら科学的な根拠を提供するものではない。
 
ヴィンセントは多くの人の肖像画を描いている。その彼が最も親しく信頼している最愛の弟のテオの肖像画を描いていないとしたら誠に不思議な話である。そんなはずはない。ヴィンセントはテオを描いているはずと言う思い人々が抱いても何ら不自然ではない。画家は弟とそっくりだったから、兄弟の肖像画を取り違えたのかもしれない。人々の好奇心と願望があれば、願望はなぜか叶えられるものである。テオの肖像画なるものが出てくる。それもゴッホに関しては世界で最も権威があるとされるヴァン・ゴッホ美術館が断定したのである。このテオの肖像画がオークションにでることはありえないから、モデルが兄であろうと弟であろうと、美術館のコレクションの経済的価値には影響を与えない。
 
この人物はテオではなく、ヴィンセント自身である。ヴィンセントが描いた人物は襟とボタンの位置から洋服を左前に着ているが、男が左前に着ることはありえない。左前に服を着ている男性は肖像画家ヴィンセントであり、この画は彼自身の鏡像画である。テオがそこにいるのにわざわざ鏡の前に立たせてその鏡像を描くだろうか。最近目が悪くなってきて確信をもてないが、HuffingPostの編集の間違いか、ヴァン・ゴッホ美術館の失態と断定せざるを得ない。セルフィーのなかった時代、写真か肖像画を撮ってくれた人がいない場合、貧乏画家、あるいは写真嫌いの画家の自画像は鏡に写った自分を見つめて描いたものである。ところでゴッホの自画像の着衣は私が知る限りすべて左前である。この問題に関しては「ゴッホが切った耳」と「ゴッホの自画像」で議論している。
 
残念ながらヴィンセントによるテオの肖像画なるものは贋作画家が登場しない限り今の所存在しない。
イメージ 1

Autumn — overlooked my Knitting —
 
Autumn — overlooked my Knitting —
Dyes — said He — have I —
Could disparage a Flamingo —
Show Me them — said I —
 
Cochineal — I chose — for deeming
It resemble Thee —
And the little Border — Dusker —
For resembling Me —
 
Emily Dickinson
 
秋は私の編み物に気付かず――
 
秋は私の編み物に気付かず――
あんたの染料はお粗末だね――
フラミンゴに笑われるよ――
染料を御覧なさいよと私――
 
コチニールを選んだのは
君に似合うと思ったから――
縁を暗い色にしたのは――
私に似合うからよ――
 
エミリ―・ディキンソン
 
せっかく、秋の色と思い、紅の糸で編んだのに!紅の秋はかえって気付かない始末。いやになる。
イメージ 1

We dream — it is good we are dreaming —
 
We dream — it is good we are dreaming —
It would hurt us — were we awake —
But since it is playing — kill us,
And we are playing — shriek —
 
What harm? Men die — externally —
It is a truth — of Blood —
But we — are dying in Drama —
And Drama — is never dead —
 
Cautious — We jar each other —
And either — open the eyes —
Lest the Phantasm — prove the Mistake —
And the livid Surprise
 
Cool us to Shafts of Granite —
With just an Age — and Name —
And perhaps a phrase in Egyptian —
It's prudenter — to dream —
 

夢を見ているのは愉快――

 

夢を見ているのは愉快――

目覚めていれば不愉快――

現実に殺されはしない、

現実でないから叫ぶ――

 

害?本当に死なない――

これは紛れない真実――

我らは劇中では死ぬが――

劇は依然として続く――

 

我ら用心して互いに触る――

どちらかが目を開ける――

幻が本当ではないのか――

おそらくエジプト文字で――

 

時代と名前が刻まれた――

大理石の円柱に触れ

冷やりとしゾットする――

眠り続ける賢明みたい――

 

エミリー・ディキンソン

イメージ 1

You cannot put a Fire out —
 
You cannot put a Fire out —
A Thing that can ignite
Can go, itself, without a Fan —
Upon the slowest Night —
 
You cannot fold a Flood —
And put it in a Drawer —
Because the Winds would find it out —
And tell your Cedar Floor —
 
Emily Dickinson
 

この光は消えない――

 

この火を消えない――

自然に発火して

扇がずとも自ずと――

真夜に広がる光――

 

豪雨を森に貯め――

隠すのは不可能――

風が見つけ出し――

杉の地に告げる――

 

エミリー・ディキンソン

 

光とか炎であいとか情熱を表し、雨で涙を表すというのはあまりに幼稚である。彼女はそんな詩人ではない。といって私の代案が良いわけではない。

 

彼女はよく比較する。第一詩説は太陽が沈んでも、その長い残照を表し、第二詩説は針葉樹の杉に雨が降ってもすぐに滴が地面に落ちるのと対比したと思うが、今一自信がない。

全695ページ

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11]

[ 次のページ ]


.


プライバシー -  利用規約 -  メディアステートメント -  ガイドライン -  順守事項 -  ご意見・ご要望 -  ヘルプ・お問い合わせ

Copyright (C) 2019 Yahoo Japan Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

みんなの更新記事